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working on a deal and nothing is locked down yet. we will talk more about the fiscal cliff this morning on "the washington journal." what tax deductions would you give up as part of a solution to the deficit problems? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. find a son facebook and weigh in there. at journal@c- span.org. "the christian science monitor," asked what we would be willing to give up. "americans would be willing to give up the tax deduction for charitable giving over other popular tax breaks." host: let's take a look at the results of this poll. 25% said that they would be willing to give up the charitable giving tax deduction. almost the same amount said it would be willing to give up their deduction for state taxes. 19% said they would be willing to give up host: we would like to hear what deduction you would give up. you can weigh in on our facebook page, there's a poll set up where you can tell us specifically which interest
on the fiscal cliff. this morning "washington journal" talk to a business representative about his take on the negotiations. host: let's begin with what is business forward, how did it come about? guest: is simple mission. our job is to make it easier for business leaders in the country who care about policy issues but did not have a washington office or a lobbyist, to speak about the issues of public policy. host: is this a brand-new organization? who is involved? >> we have been around 3 1/2 years, supported by some of the biggest companies of the world, with business leaders are in the country. we go out to small business owners, entrepreneurs, venture capitalist to get them involved in policy-making. what we do is we bring administration officials, members of congress, governors out to cities around the country to be briefings with business leaders. what we also do is bring the business leaders to washington. we tell them how to grow jobs and accelerate. host: what did the business leaders say to the president and how did it come about? guest: we have been doing this for a year, bri
this discussion, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff and the more american jobs are placed in jeopardy. >> good morning. lings -- the president said on a daily basis that we should be passing a balance plan. but we continue to hear only discussion on one side of the ledger. it's always been about tax rates increases and nothing about spending. we insist, let's talk about a balanced plan, where are your proposals for spending cuts. even his advisors say any agreement we come to has to include entitlement programs. we ask the president, please, sit down and be specific with us. let's get that balanced plan. it's interesting the senate passed a bill. the president continues to say support that bill, pass that bill. how is that the case when he continues to say we also need $1.4 trillion in additional new revenues. there's an inconsistency here. let's stop playing gapes. we want to be here for the american people and we want to make sure that we get a balanced solution so that we can start focusing on the one thing that we have seemed to have forgotten, and that is, it's about jobs and the
be a powerful impact on them harmful impact on them. fiscal cliff negotiations underway here in washington, d.c. continuing and washington state and colorado celebrating the freedom to smoke pot legally. all of that coming up plus yesterday jim demint from south carolina announced he is resigning from the senate to take over as head of the heritage foundation. >> that's good news for the senate. get rid of that whacko tea partyer but bad news for the heritage foundation, which will now have a reputation as the most extreme of all of of our think tanks welt tell you ideal he is leaving and more. current news update, standing buy in los angeles lease a ferguson. hi, lease a. good morning. >> hey, bi. good morning, everyone. we are awaiting the jobs report this morning out in the next and we are expecting to hear 80,000 jobs created last month. >> that's less than half the jobs we saw in october, but economists are saying don't put too much weight on those numbers. the down turn in growth is likely thanks to hurricane sandy making it near impossible to tel
: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: with the fiscal cliff fast approaching, i feel the need to point out something this morning that's perfectly obvious to most americans but which democrats in washington still don't seem to grasp. i'm referring to the fact that any solution to our spending and debt problem has to involve cuts to out-of-control washington spending. i know that might sound obvious to most people but for all the president's talk about the need for a balanced approach, the truth is he and his democratic allies simply refused to be pinned down on any spending cuts. americans overwhelmingly support some level of cuts to government spending as part of a plan to cut the federal deficit. yet, the president will not commit to it. he refuses to lead on the issue. the president seems to think if all he talks about are taxes and that's all reporters write about, somehow the rest of us will magically forget that government spending is completely out of control and that he himself has been insisting on balance. a couple of weeks ago we saw his plan. after four straight trillion-dollar
:30 eastern. you can see the house live when they return here on c-span. in the meantime while fiscal cliff negotiations continue, we hosted a roundtable discussion about the debt talks and domestic program cuts on this morning's "washington journal." can host: isabel sawhim and james capretta. mr. capretta, let me begin with you. are these sequester cuts devastating? guest: they would be deep cuts. 80% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in the immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world? no. host: what do you mean by that? guest: there would be a downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of domestic accounts. so there would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduce in federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of 5%, 10%. so there would be some downsizing of the services that are provided by the federal government. but the economy would go on and the government would go on and the public would still continue to get by and large serviced. host: can agen
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6